TAKING TIME

Prayer: Lord, help me to slow down today to really listen to one need that You have for me to meet as You enable me. Amen

Scripture: For He satisfieth the longing soul, and filleth the hungry soul with goodness. Psalm 107:9 KJV

He sat, head slumped on top of the computer keys. While the other students were researching African colonies, he sat, motionless.

“Michael. Are you sick?” No answer. “Are you tired?” No answer. Finally I heard a small sound, “I’m hungry.”

“You’re hungry? You didn’t eat breakfast?”

I told him I had a nutrition bar in my book bag and took him into the hall. I handed it to him but he didn’t eat it. “I’ll save it,” he said.

“No. You won’t save it. You’ll eat it now while I’m looking.” He wolfed it down and went back into the computer lab and started his research. As I walked past him while checking on all the students Michael smiled and said, “I feel better now.”

We have to slow down to notice what is going on with our students. Failure to slow down can cause us to make hasty or unfair judgments. It took perhaps seven minutes out of my day to interact with Michael to find out why he had his head on the computer keys instead of doing his work.

If we take time to look and listen, it can make the difference in how young people perceive education for the rest of their lives. Michael wasn’t being disrespectful or rebellious. He wasn’t apathetic or indifferent. He was hungry. It’s such a small thing to carry nutrition bars in my bookbag. Such a minor intrusion into my day to stop and ask some questions and listen to the answers.

Copyright Cheryl Skid. To connect with the author, email info@christianeducators.org

For other inquiries about the Daily Devotionals or to submit original content for publication, please contact devotionals@christianeducators.org

For other inquiries about the Daily Devotionals or to submit original content for publication, please contact
devotionals@christianeducators.org

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